Basic coniferous assortment

Spruce
Spruce
Wood of spruce is creamy white to brownish, with distinctive annular rings. On all three cuts (transverse, longitudinal, tangent), we can easily see the distinctive color differentiation of the spring and summer incremental layers of wood. Spruce despite its softness is tough, relatively stiff and flexible. Spruce has very favorable properties for machining, so the spruce became, thanks to man, our most widespread tree.
Spruce wood is soft, silky, glossy, resinous, fairly light, long-fiber, very flexible and strong, well-splittable. It is well cut, planted, milled, sized, sealed, painted and painted. Relatively little is ruffling and shaking. It is very durable in dry conditions. The carpenter uses it on rafters, rafters, formworks and grading. Joinery for so-called farm (soft) furniture. The old beams are made replicas chests, komodo, cabinets, etc. Bricklayers use spruce for trowel, formwork and scaffolding floors. Spruce is an important raw material for paper production. The peculiarity is so-called resonance spruce (stems with a high density of rings) from which musical instruments are produced
Pine
Pine
The pinewood is soft, more brittle than spruce, the white part is creamy white to ocher, the core orange-brown to birch. The rings are distinctive. Wood in the case of inappropriate processing has suffered from a characteristic flare which degrades it.
Thanks to resistance, pine wood is mainly used for windows and doors, including frames. They also apply well to the beams, tiles and "pillows" under the floor. Mordants and coatings accept less than spruce. Core wood is also getting worse. However, the greatest disadvantage of machining and grinding is the strong clogging of the tools and the abrasives with the resin.
Larch
Larch
Larch wood is semi-hard, harder than spruce or pine, solid and durable. The pale layer is pale yellow-brown, the core is ocher to reddish-brown. In the air and after soaking it darkens. The texture is more dense than the spruce, and it excels in the beauty of many small, mostly well-grown souls. It is working well, does not attach as many tools as pine and better accepts glue and filling.
Larch wood is used to produce shingles, massive furniture, stairs, railing, lining, etc.